Opinion

Space-based storage is the new media star, writes Cliff Beek of Cloud Constellation Corp

Cliff Beek, President of Cloud Constellation Corporation

“A space-based cloud storage network would provide government and private organisations with an independent cloud infrastructure platform, completely isolating and protecting sensitive data from the outside world,” writes Cliff Beek, President of Cloud Constellation Corporation and a guest columnist for BroadcastPro ME. 

The media and entertainment industries have faced unprecedented cyber security challenges over the last year. One studio suffered the theft of an entire season of a popular show, and another had an unreleased film stolen. In both cases, the material was held for ransom by cyber criminals.

Global spending on information security is estimated to have reached $90 billion in 2017, according to Gartner. Yet the data breaches keep coming. The switch from perimeter to endpoint network security has not happened quickly enough, and alone is insufficient to meet today’s advanced threats.

The Internet of Things is a virtual minefield of security challenges. The US Federal Trade Commission’s recent suit against a router manufacturer speaks to the severity of the threats that can be caused by insecure internet-connected devices. Last year’s massive Mirai botnet attack, which took most of the US offline for a day, is a case in point.

Experian highlighted several trends in its yearly Data Breach Industry Forecast that took centre stage in 2017. One of them was international data breaches with the potential to cause significant problems for multinational companies, particularly in light of an EU regulation about to take effect (see the following note on GDPR).

Another Experian prediction is downright frightening: government-sponsored cyber attacks will escalate from espionage to proactive cyber war. One movie studio may have fallen victim to this type of attack in 2014 when it was hacked on the eve of releasing a film that portrayed a nation’s totalitarian leader unfavourably. This could be the shape of things to come for companies that create or distribute content foreign governments may find offensive.

Jurisdictional burdens

Global cyber security concerns have led to increasing security measures and legislation, culminating in the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). It requires greater oversight of where and how sensitive data – such as personal, banking, health and credit card information – is stored and transferred. The regulation applies to all organisations processing the personal data of people residing in the EU, regardless of the company’s location.

This creates a jurisdictional nightmare for companies. There are only two solutions to the dilemma of GDPR compliance. The majority of affected organisations will scramble to erect infrastructure and processes and deploy personnel to make sure they meet the stringent requirements. The other option is to remove the relevant data from the GDPR’s jurisdiction altogether, which means taking it ‘off-world’.

Storage based in space

The time has come to think outside the terrestrial box. There are already satellites ringing the Earth that regularly receive and transmit information; why not develop a system for secure, internet-free data storage and transmission? A space-based cloud storage network would provide government and private organisations with an independent cloud infrastructure platform, completely isolating and protecting sensitive data from the outside world.

New technologies have just recently been designed to deliver this type of independent space-based network infrastructure for cloud service providers, enterprises and governments to experience secure storage and provisioning of sensitive data around the world.

Space-based storage and transmission, though, offers a radically different alternative to data security for media and entertainment.

In addition, delivery speed will increase, creating new broadcast possibilities. For greater safety, speed and peace of mind, space-based storage is the new media star.